Skip to main content

This is a new service – your feedback will help us to improve it.

Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:46:10 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.1 Checks on animals and low risk plants and plant products at BCPs from March 2022. Is that 1st March or 31st March? A. 1st March 2022
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:46:42 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.2 Pet Food SPS requirements were 3 months after Food Products. Is this still the case? A. Currently, if you are exporting or moving animal feed and pet food to, or through the EU, non-EU countries and Northern Ireland (NI) you will need an export Health certificate (EHC) if the animal feed and pet food is made from products of animal origin (POAO). You will also need to get your goods checked at an EU Border Control Post (BCP) or NI point of entry in the first country you enter. From 1/10/21, pre-notification requirements for the import of products of animal origin (POAO), high risk food not of animal origin (HRFNAO) and certain animal by products. From 01/01/22, i.e. three months later, physical SPS checks for products of animal origin, certain animal by-products, HRFNAO and high risk plants will take place at BCPs.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:47:09 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.3 Is the introduction of GVMS also being delayed?
A. GVMS was introduced in January 2021 only for transit movements from the EU and for goods moving from GB to NI. Border loactions without existing control systems at the end of the transition, including RoRo listed locations, will not be required to control EU goods on the basis of declarations until 1 January 2022. This will support the flow of goods through these ports and minimise the chance of delays. Loactions with existing systems will use their systems to facilitate the control of goods where declarations are present in HMRC systems (such as controlled goods) imported from the EU. HMRC has worked with these locations to ensure non-controlled goods are allowed to flow through. GVMS will not be required to facilitate import or export controls between GB and EU until 1 January 2022. 
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:47:37 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.4 Can we have a confirmation that the certification requirement for low risk plants has been postponed by 9 months (from April 2021 to Jan 2022)?
A. Yes, From 1 January 2022, the requirement for pre-notifications, phytosanitary certificates and documentary checks will be extended to all regulated plants and plant products (i.e. not just those which are ‘high-priority’). A list of regulated, and regulated and notifiable goods can be found here
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:48:02 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.5 As part of this delay, are the UK Government taking the opportunity to work with the Commission and Member States on their preparedness? A. The Government has and will continue to work closely with the EU and Member States.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:48:11 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.6 Will LA (Local Authority) PHA (Port Health Authority) funding be extended?
A. Defra are aware of the impact that the 6 month delay to the SPS checks may have had some PHAs financial position given recruitment conducted to date. The SPS readiness team are in the process of engaging with PHAs on an individual basis to understand the effects of the delays on them; this will inform ongoing discussion on this within Defra. We are aware of the assurances given in association with the PHA transition funding and taking this into account. 
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:48:29 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.7 Is the requirement for inventory linking still in place for 1st July?
A. Border locations without existing control systems at the end of transition, including RoRo listed locations, will not be required to control EU goods on the basis of declarations until 1 January 2022. This will support the flow of goods through these ports and minimise the chance of delays. Locations with existing systems will use their systems to facilitate the control of goods where declarations are present in HMRC systems (such as controlled goods) imported from the EU. HMRC has worked with these locations to ensure non-controlled goods are allowed to flow through. 
From 1 January 2022, goods imported from the EU will be subject to standard customs control. Border locations receiving goods that are moving into GB from the EU will be able to choose between the two models for customs control: the tried and tested model that is currently used to controlled goods moving between the UK and the rest of the world, known as the temporary storage model, or the new pre-lodgement model. 
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:48:39 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.8 Will the Grant Funding Agreement (GFA) "Due Date" be amended from 1st July 2021 to 1st Oct 2022?
A. If you are the recipient of a Port Infrastructure Fund Grant, we encourage you to continue with the signing of the Grant Funding Agreement (GFA) so that we can get PIF funds to you as soon as possible. If you have already signed your GFA, but now wish to change the payment milestones, please let us know. We will work with you to review and, if necessary, amend, delivery dates and payment milestones to reflect any agreed changes. Any changes required to the GFA will be by mutual agreement and formalised where significant by way of an exchange of letters. 
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:48:59 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.9 Are there any changes to current IUU controls? A. There are no changes to the current Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing Regulation (EC No 1005/2008)
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:49:16 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.10 Our exporters continue to face the additional costs and run the risk of financial losses if product is turned back or held up at the border, but today’s announcement means that EU producers will maintain access to the UK market relatively burden free for a considerable amount of time. What if anything has HMG secured from the EU in making this concession? A. The announcement of the revised timetable for the introduction of import controls was a unilateral decision taken by Ministers having listened to UK businesses who have made a strong case that they needed more time to prepare.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:49:51 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.11 Emma, what's the plan for those businesses who have signed contracts and incurred significant costs (e.g. for accelerated BCP build) to meet July 1st deadline? A. We appreciate that many in the border industry including ports and businesses have been investing time and energy to be ready on time, and some will have been on schedule to have met the original 01st July deadline. However, we needed to listen to businesses who made a strong case that they needed more time to prepare hence the revised timetable to also to ensure that the economy can recover fully from the impact of COVID-19.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:50:11 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.12 What is low risk plant? Is rice included or not affected? A. There are some plants and plant products that are considered low risk and therefore can be imported into GB from the EU and third countries without a phytosanitary certificate. The phytosanitary certificate is an official declaration stating that plants and plant material are free from pests and diseases, so as to prevent introduction and spread of any pests in the importing countries. Rice for consumption does not require a phytosanitary certificate when being exported from GB to the EU. However, rice seed and rice ‘plants for planting’ (intended to be planted, remain planted or to be replanted) are regulated for plant health purposes and will require a phytosanitary certificate.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:50:31 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.13 What is the status of the infrastructure being delivered for import checking (ie BCPs)? A. In July 2020, the government committed to spending £470m on new border infrastructure to support ports in building extra capacity to meet the new control requirements where there is space to do so, and, if necessary, to build additional inland sites across the country where checks can take place. Some ports are on track to meet what was the original proposed deadline of 01st July 2020 for BCP builds however now with the revised timetable, ports and businesses will be given longer time to prepare. Physical SPS checks for products of animal origin, certain animal by-products, HRFNAO and high risk plants will take place at BCPs from January 2022 and checks on live animals, low risk plants and plant products will taking place in March 2022.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:51:07 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.14 When will checks on EU origin organic products start? A. Organic products imported from the EU, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland to GB will now not require a certificate of inspection (COI) until 1 January 2022. There is no change to the movement of organic goods from NI to GB. You do not need a COI if you’re moving goods from NI to GB. Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, EU Organic Regulations apply in NI. The movement of organic goods from GB to NI must be accompanied by a valid COI using the EU’s TRACES NT. You do not need to pay for a COI as these costs are covered by the Movement Assistance Scheme.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:51:29 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.15 Is there still the requirement for all ports to be inventory linked from 30/6 where Temporary Storage? And what is impact of further easements on GVMS and Transit requirements?
A. Border locations without existing control systems at the end of transition, including RoRo listed locations, will not be required to control EU goods on the basis of declarations until 1 January 2022. This will support the flow of goods through these ports and minimise the chance of delays. Locations with existing systems will use their systems to facilitate the control of goods where declarations are present in HMRC systems (such as controlled goods) imported from the EU. HMRC has worked with these locations to ensure non-controlled goods are allowed to flow through. 
From 1 January 2022, goods imported from the EU will be subject to standard customs control. Border locations receiving goods that are moving into GB from the EU will be able to choose between the two models for customs control: the tried and tested model that is currently used to controlled goods moving between the UK and the rest of the world, known as the temporary storage model, or the new pre-lodgement model. 
GVMS was introduced in January 2021 only for transit movements from the EU and for goods moving from GB to NI. It was not scheduled to cover all goods movements until July 2021 when customs declarations on all goods were required at the point of import. With this announcement, GVMS will now be in place from January 2022 for all imports and exports at GB port locations which have chosen to introduce it. 
Transit is subject to a wider convention across the countries that are part of the Common Transit Convention. The UK cannot therefore make unilateral decisions on these requirements and so the transit requirements will continue to apply. 
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:52:00 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.16 How will this affect catch certificate for EU origin fish? Will these new dates apply to these? A. To import fish to the UK from another country (excluding EU fish into Northern Ireland), you will need a catch certificate validated by the competent authority of the country where the fishing vessel is registered or licensed. Imports or movements of fish from EU/EEA/EFTA countries to GB do not need to enter at a border control post now until 1January 2022. From Great Britain to Northern Ireland must enter at a designated point of entry in Northern Ireland. From 1 October 2021, if you are importing EU origin fish from the EU then you must pre-notify the import on IPAFFS and upload a digital copy of your EHC/IUU documents and make sure that a certified EHC physically accompanies the consignment. From 1 January 2022, imports of EU origin fish from the EU must enter via a point of entry at a BCP.Further guidance can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/importing-or-moving-fish-to-the-uk
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:52:47 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.17 Will these new dates apply to EU origin organic food feed or will 1st July date still apply? A. Organic products imported from the EU, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland to GB will now not require a certificate of inspection (COI) until 1 January 2022. There is no change to the movement of organic goods from NI to GB. You do not need a COI if you’re moving goods from NI to GB. Under the terms of the Northern Ireland Protocol, EU Organic Regulations apply in NI. The movement of organic goods from GB to NI must be accompanied by a valid COI using the EU’s TRACES NT. You do not need to pay for a COI as these costs are covered by the Movement Assistance Scheme.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:53:07 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.18 Does this mean that the use of GVMS for EU/UK?EU shipments is delayed until 1st Jan 2022?
A. GVMS was introduced in January 2021 only for transit movements from the EU and for goods moving from GB to NI. Border locations without existing control systems at the end of transition, including RoRo listed locations, will not be required to control EU goods on the basis of declarations until 1 January 2022. This will support the flow of goods through these ports and minimise the chance of delays. Locations with existing systems will use their systems to facilitate the control of goods where declarations are present in HMRC systems (such as controlled goods) imported from the EU. HMRC has worked with these locations to ensure non-controlled goods are allowed to flow through. GVMS will not be required to facilitate import or exportcontrols between GB and the EU until 1 January 2022.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:53:27 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.19 Do we get a new version of BOM? A. Yes, we will update the BOM shortly.
Posted Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:53:48 GMT by HM Government Admin1
Q.20 What are the implications for the implementation of customs controls at ports and new port approvals along with start date for use of GVMS under the pre-lodgement model. Will this delay requirement for EXS as well as ENS to 1 January 2022?
A. Border locations without existing control systems at the end of transition, including RoRo listed locations, will not be required to control EU goods on the basis of declarations until 1 January 2022. This will support the flow of goods through these ports and minimise the chance of delays. Locations with existing systems will use their systems to facilitate the control of goods where declarations are present in HMRC systems (such as controlled goods) imported from the EU. HMRC has worked with these locations to ensure non-controlled goods are allowed to flow through. 
From 1 January 2022, goods imported from the EU will be subject to standard customs control. Border locations receiving goods that are moving into GB from the EU will be able to choose between the two models for customs control: the tried and tested model that is currently used to controlled goods moving between the UK and the rest of the world, known as the temporary storage model, or the new pre-lodgement model. 
GVMS was introduced in January 2021 only for transit movements from the EU and for goods moving from GB to NI. It was not scheduled to cover all goods movements until July 2021 when customs declarations on all goods were required at the point of import. With this announcement, GVMS will now be in place from January 2022 for all imports and exports at GB port locations which have chosen to introduce it. 
On approvals, until 1 January 2022 temporary customs approvals will cover any border locations receiving any goods imported or exported from the EU that do not currently hold an approval or hold an expired approval. These temporary customs approcvals will not require operators do not need to make an application. 
From 1 January 2022, all locations will need a full customs approval. If ports choose to operate the pre-lodgement model to control goods moving between GB and the EU, its obligations will be set out in their wharf approval. If the location chooses to use the temporary storage model, they will require both a customs approval and a Temporary Storage Facility approval which will set out their temporary storage obligations. 
Entry Summary Declarations (ENS) will not be required for goods imported into GB from the EU until 1 January 2022 and we are currently reviewing the Exit Summary Declaration (EXS) requirements waiver options in light of the new timetable for phasing import controls. 

You must be signed in to post in this forum.